GRAHAM T BECK writes

The Iron in Man

I had always assumed I would know if my penis was bleeding. Dick trauma, I figured, was one of those things in life—like having sex or getting stabbed to death—that I’d be aware of when it was happening. But after 11 hours of swimming, biking, and running, I didn’t notice that blood was soaking into the padded chamois of my spandex shorts. Instead, I was talking to the guy next to me about the Adirondack Mountains that soared around us. His wife’s family has a camp up there. It’s where they got married. “Beautiful country,” he said, before turning to the side of the road and retching into a blueberry bush.

“You OK?”

“Yah.”

And so I kept going as he dry-heaved, shuffling away on legs so tired and filled with aches that they were asleep and on fire at the same time.

It is 6 p.m. on July 27, 2014. I had started the Lake Placid Ironman a little before seven in the morning.

Read more at The Morning News.

Written by graham t beck

October 23, 2014 at 4:37 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Nervous Their Airline Hubs Will Fly Away, Cities Race to Flood-Proof Their Airports

At the height of Hurricane Sandy’s storm surge, the tarmac at New York City’s LaGuardia Airport was completely submerged, its jetways extending eerily into what appeared to be a rippling lakebed. When the heaviest winter rains on record drenched England earlier this year, the River Mole topped its banks and shut down half of Gatwick Airport. In Malaysia, a flash flood this spring forced arriving passengers at Penang Airport to wade through knee-deep water. And in 2011, at Bangkok’s Don Muang International, Thai Airways 777s sat wheel-deep in murky water as the worst floods on record in that city closed the airport for over a week.

Read more at Next City.

Written by graham t beck

October 23, 2014 at 4:29 pm

Posted in Next American City

New York’s New $335 Million Storm-Surge Barrier Will Transform the Lower East Side

Manhattan’s Lower East Side is about to get a waterfront park/promenade/play space to rival the High Line, but instead of being repurposed from last century‘s leftover infrastructure, this one will be brand new and on call to protect the city from future storm-surge events.

Read more at Next City.

Written by graham t beck

October 23, 2014 at 4:28 pm

Posted in Next American City

The Neighborhood Hurricane Sandy Couldn’t Flood

“Devastated” is the word often used to describe the Rockaway Peninsula in the months following Hurricane Sandy, and with good reason. The 11-mile spit of low-lying land that separates Jamaica Bay from the Atlantic Ocean was one of the hardest hit areas in New York City. In the Rockaway community of Breezy Point, 135 homes burned to the ground. The beach at Fort Tilden was so badly damaged that it has yet to reopen. And residents of Rockaway – where the bay and the ocean met – lost their boardwalk, their subway connection to the rest of the city and their power for nearly a month.

Read more at Next City.

Written by graham t beck

October 23, 2014 at 4:25 pm

Posted in Next American City

This Staten Island Neighborhood Is About to Become a Wetland

Before Hurricane Sandy, Staten Island’s Fox Beach neighborhood was a tight-knit, working-class community nestled on the Atlantic Ocean just 20 miles south of Manhattan. By this time next year, it will be an expanse of wetlands.

Read more at Next City.

Written by graham t beck

October 23, 2014 at 3:17 pm

Posted in Next American City

New York’s Plan to Save Its Wastewater System from the Next Sandy

On the night of October 29, 2012, as Hurricane Sandy’s storm surge overwhelmed the city’s coastline, 10 of New York’s 14 wastewater treatment plants, and 42 of its 96 pumping stations, suffered roughly $100 million in damages.

Read more at Next City.

Written by graham t beck

October 23, 2014 at 3:16 pm

Posted in Next American City

Landmark Court Ruling Could Change Disaster Planning for the Disabled

As Hurricane Irene made its way up the East Coast at the end of August 2011, 26-year-old Tania Morales did everything she was supposed to do. She tuned in to the news, made arrangements to get around without the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, and when Mayor Bloomberg ordered a mandatory evacuation of people residing in Zone A of the city’s Area Evacuation Plan, she headed to a nearby shelter at a public school that she’d found on the city’s website.

Read more at Next City.

Written by graham t beck

October 23, 2014 at 3:14 pm

Posted in Next American City

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